UNICEF

UNICEF supports roll out vaccines against infectious diseases and cervical cancer for Pacific children

 

The deployment of the three vaccines is part of the US$29.7 million System Strengthening for Effective Coverage of New Vaccines in the Pacific Project, which is supporting the introduction of these vaccines in Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

Financed by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the vaccine project was originally established to support the procurement of rotavirus, pneumococcal conjugate, and human papilloma virus vaccines through the United Nations Children's Fund.

UNICEF welcomes Japan’s contribution

The US$5.0 million is to help strengthen the capacity of vaccine cold chain logistics in support of the country’s COVID-19 response efforts.

Provincial health authorities and health facilities in 17 provinces in the country will benefit from this contribution that will help support vital cold chain logistics required to safely store and provide COVID-19 vaccines and also support the routine immunization program.

This will help prevent the stock out of essential vaccines for children in the country.

Specifically, the funding will contribute to:

Japan donates cold chain

The cold chain equipment were delivered to the Department of Health yesterday at the Health Facility Standard Branch in NCD.

‘”The cold chain equipment come under an agreement signed in March between the Japanese Government and UNICEF to extend an Emergency Grant Aid of approximately 3 million US dollars or equivalent 324 million Japanese Yen,” said Shinichi Maruo – Charge d’Affaires of the Embassy of Japan.

UNICEF, Japan Aids Pacific Nations

The partnership covers support to the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

Ambassador of Japan in Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru and Tuvalu, Kawakami Fumihiro said: “The Government of Japan is aware of how hard Pacific Island governments are working to protect the population from COVID-19.

Primero launch to help address GBV

Child protection officers and volunteers and other informal service providers offering case management services will use Primero as a tool to manage cases of violence, abuse, neglect of women and children. With the system they will be able to collect, store, analyse and share protection-related data that can be used for planning, budgeting and advocacy.

PMVs help spread awareness

The work on the stickers commenced early this month, with the campaign to end in a few days’ time.  This was initiated under the European Union and the WASH project by UNICEF.

So far, 28 PMV buses from various routes in the city have been promoting handwashing and safe hygiene messages in the city. They have played a key role in disseminating these messages to over 300,000 people within NCD.

There are also plans to continue this campaign in partnership with the National Capital District Commission.  

Additional K8m for COVID-19 response

Made available through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), this brings the total U.S. government assistance to nearly K12 million ($3.5 million). 

USAID awarded K6 million (USD $1.75 million) to FHI360 to support clinics in the National Capital District, building capacity on infection prevention and control, supporting facilities, expanding testing capacity, establishing response teams, upgrading WASH facilities and facilitating contact tracing.

UN agencies tell Pacific to vaccinate against measles

They said this should to happen before travelling internationally, attending major events or community gatherings.

Vaccination provided the best protection against measles and parents should get their children immunised, the agencies said.

In October, Samoa and Tonga both declared measles outbreaks.

Both UNICEF and the WHO said they were continuing to provide resources to Pacific states to respond to the measles threat.

     

Clean water and sanitation a huge Pacific challenge - UNICEF

That's according to the UN agency for children or UNICEF which works with almost a million children across the region.

Pacific representative Sheldon Yett said there are many factors hampering progress on the issue including geography, natural disasters and the negative impacts of climate change.

"We are working actually to make sure that they can make the most out of the water that they have. To make sure that kids have access to good hygiene. To make sure that kids are teaching their parents and other community members what to do.

Polio strategies developed

These strategies came about following lessons learnt in the last 100 days of the emergency response.

The polio outbreak response plan of Papua New Guinea focuses on three main components: 

  • Supplementary immunisation activities
  • Enhanced surveillance; and
  • Communication

The supplementary immunisation activities have seen two national immunisation campaigns targeting more than 3.26 million children under 15 years old across 22 provinces.