Cancer

Dustin Diamond diagnosed with cancer

The 44-year-old, who played Samuel "Screech" Powers in the popular 1990s US school-based sitcom, fell ill last week and was taken to hospital.

His representative, Roger Paul, said the actor is now waiting for further details.

"We will know the severity of it when the tests are done," Paul said, adding they expect an update next week.

Saved by the Bell ran for four seasons from 1989 to 1993 and followed a group of high school friends and their principal.

TruTru Wara support Pinktober

Through this partnership the PNGCF has visited over 20 locations across 5 provinces this month under the Pink Ribbon Labelled Tru Tru Wara Bottled Water.

Cancer drugs logistics enabled

In a small ceremony within the Cancer Clinic this week, head of cancer clinic, Dr. Peter Olali thanked both Post PNG and Sesago Healthcare for making it possible for cancer drugs, gleevec Imatinib Misylate to be delivered to patients with a form of leukemia.

Digicel in mourning following death of former Group CEO, Colm Delves

Colm passed away yesterday in Dublin, Ireland after a courageous battle with cancer.

Live a healthy lifestyle

Lawes Road Clinic’s gynaecologist, Dr Lutty Amos, made this statement when speaking at the end of the weekly Walk and Yoga for Life program at Paga Hill Ring Road on October 20.

She revealed that during her team’s government department visits this year, five in every 100 women in the city have at least gotten screened, urging the need for more awareness and actions against cancer.

Dr Amos shared a sad reality of having screened only 3,700 women in NCD for cancer detection since the opening its cryotherapy unit to the public for Pap smear test in October, 2016.

BSP supports cancer awareness

Funds presented were raised from a staff initiated morning tea fundraiser that was held on Friday 12th October to mark Breast Cancer Awareness month and raise awareness on cancer. 

Priscillar Napoleon, Executive Manager – Papua New Guinea Cancer Foundation, thanked the staff for the initiative and the support of the Bank and its employees.

“As a charitable organisation, PNGCF’s work would not be possible without the backing of local companies and individuals,” said Napoleon.

Cancer patient’s plea to Government

But like the plight faced by many other average Papua New Guineans battling cancer, Sr. Maputiane needs urgent medical treatment overseas.

She is now questioning the government as to what extent they will allow cancer patients in the country to suffer before lifesaving medical intervention can be introduced into the health system. 

Sr. Maputiane was first diagnosed in August 2016 and underwent a major operation in June 2017 at the Port Moresby General Hospital.

Drug shortage more serious than imagined!

Bernadette Kapini is a recent breast cancer survivor feeling the burden of this.

She was forced to stop her chemotherapy only three months into it, after being told the medicine stock at the Port Moresby General Hospital ran out.

Kapini had undergone a mastectomy at the Pacific International Hospital in June 2017, where one of her breasts was surgically removed.

She began her chemotherapy treatment with the Port Moresby General Hospital’s Obstetrics and Gynaecology division in July.

Wayne Smith treated for cancer

Smith, who stood down from the national team following the Rugby Championship, told Fairfax that he found about his prostate cancer during the tournament, but he and his wife decided to keep it quiet.

60 year old Smith had an operation in December and says the news has been very positive since.

Smith has plans to do some coaching advisory work in both Japan and Italy.

 

     

First and foremost: Behavioural change

This is about healthy lifestyle choices and begins way before being diagnosed with cancer.

It is primary prevention.

Toka Jnr said the curative aspect of cancer (treating cancer) is expensive; not just in PNG but in the world.

“We only have one cancer unit in the country that does radiotherapy. There are other hospitals also that do chemo and surgical which we’re very fortunate. But once again, the options are very limited and this is where prevention is very important,” he said.