Everyday people PNG

Everyday People PNG: Molly Vani

My story entails the village court life. I have been in this employment for the past 24 years starting out as just a clerk. I am now the Deputy Chairperson of the village court, as I found that being the Chairlady was too much to take on.

Everyday People: Gomara Gorua

School for me began in the village, with me doing my grades one to six at the Boregaina Community School and we were most probably the last batch of kids that sat for the year six exams.

I then did my grades seven to ten at Kwikila High school and I happy to say that we were the first ones then who took up what is now called Basic Technology.

Everyday People: Martin Rawali

My love for music created the well-known Azzimbah Band back in the 80s and after some time I decided to go solo.

I formed the Froggies Band a while after performing at bars and hotels building a repertoire of local favorites that are still a hit whenever played on either the airwaves or stages.

As an artist, music has helped me a lot in ways to putting food on the table, paying bills and getting my kids through school and of course being recognized as an artist on local and international platforms.

Everyday People PNG: Hannah Aria

I raise my boys to be vibrant and to express themselves freely but also to be great citizens of this country.

Growing up, my parents were strict with me so quite contrary to what my friends may think, I was an extreme introvert. It is safe to say, I am the opposite today.

When I was younger, my ultimate goal was to be an architect, but once I reached University, my dad introduced me to Leo Wafiwa, during registration at the UPNG and four years later, I graduated with a Degree in Journalism and Public Relations. The best decision ever.

Everyday People PNG: Judith Puee

In 2005, Judith started her teaching career with a passion to bring about change in Panguna, Central Bougainville.

She and her husband are now working at Metonai Elementary School in Panguna District. Judith teaches a composite prep and grade one class, and her husband is a teaching assistant.

“Many students I’ve taught have already graduated from university,” Judith said, beaming with pride.

“Two have become high school teachers and a few are now primary school teachers,” she said.

Everyday People: Amanda Kundil

Who is Amanda Kundil?

“I am the Communications Officer for the PNG NRI Autonomy and Decentralization Research Project. I am 22 years old and I come from a mixed parentage of Western Highlands and Eastern Highlands. I graduated from the University of Papua New Guinea, majoring in English Communication.

“I have been in this position since July this year, and it is way different from my former workplace. I am kept on my toes and am learning on the job as well!

Everyday People: Lance Corporal Langan Pakau

On the far right against the backdrop of the Recruit Company Lines, recruits ran out in numbers to form up outside. 

"Stand at ease. Attention! “It was the duty Non Commissioned Officer, Lance Corporal Langan Pakau barking the words of command at the recruits.

Lance Corporal Pakau is an instructor at the home of PNGDF recruitment training at Goldie River Training Depot in the Central Province of Papua New Guinea. He is among the many soldiers and officers currently posted to the Training Cell or on detachment at Goldie for the recruit training.

Everyday People: Karokapi Gure

Karokapi said an important lesson that she will always remember from her family is to ‘Always be there for people.’ A key reminder as she works in an organization that is people-centered.

The young woman said she loves her job as it allows her to “Get to meet a lot of people from different fields” and travel around as well.

She has worked for the Sago Network for a year now. When asked if she sees herself in the organization in the near future, she replied: “I do see myself growing in the organization that I am in.”

Everyday People: Luke Mark

He is the last born of a family of six siblings, four boys and two girls.  His education in the village only reached Grade 6. Since his parents passed on, Luke has no idea about his age, nor when he last did Grade 6. Luke decided to come to Port Moresby in search for better life and to further his education hoping that his relatives could assist him but they did not. He reckons they think backwards as they do not see the importance of education.

Everyday People: Evelyn Mark

“I don’t have a house but I’m renting one of those K100 rooms at Vadavada. I don’t have any family, I am living on my own. I don’t even have a partner,” she says.

Evelyn’s husband passed away in 2014 and left her with a son who is now 16 years old, and lives in Wabag with is mother’s relatives. She said she is not able to put her child to school because she couldn’t find enough money to pay for his school fees.  

“I find life very difficult for me and there is no one to take care of me, so this little market is very important to me for my survival, Evelyn said.