IMF

O’Neill describes IMF report as ‘nuisance’

The IMF report noted that Medium-term growth is expected to converge to about 3 percent, supported by agriculture and preparations for the hosting of APEC 2018.

The Report stated that the Government plans to spend K3 billion over 2015-18 on the preparations for APEC 2018 (e.g., upgrading the airport).

Thus, 2018 will see a winding down of construction activity, with overall growth projected to slow down to 1½ percent in 2018 and stabilise at 3 percent over the longer term.

IMF warns of hit to UK economic growth

Although the IMF raised its prediction for UK GDP growth this year to 1.8%, the figure for 2017 was cut to 1.1%.

Its assumptions are based on "smooth post-Brexit negotiations and a limited increase in economic barriers".

The IMF's latest World Economic Outlook predicts "subpar" global growth this year of 3.1%, rising slightly in 2017.

Spain Bankia fraud trial for ex-IMF boss Rodrigo Rato

The defendants allegedly used "unofficial" company credit cards for luxury purchases, unconnected with their duties as board members.

Prosecutors say about €12m (£10.4m; $13.5m) was spent on hotels, fine clothes, entertainment and travel.

Mr Rato denies wrongdoing. Bankia was rescued in 2012 at huge public expense.

The unofficial credit card purchases were not declared to the tax authorities. The system allegedly started at Caja Madrid bank and was continued by Mr Rato when Bankia was created in 2011.

PNG seeing ‘green shoots’ of economic recovery: O’Neill

He said with a number of major oil, gas and mining projects continuing to progress towards the final approval and construction stages, the country is in a stable economic position.

O’Neill made these remarks after the International Monetary Fund (IMF) warns on slower global economic growth this year and in 2017.

“The Bank of Papua New Guinea has pointed to private sector growing in the first quarter of 2016, compared with a decline in the December quarter of 2015.

More borrowing is not the right answer: Sir Mekere

In a statement, Sir Mekere said he was surprised the IFC would even consider such a loan.

“The Prime Minister cannot borrow his way out of the problems he has created.

“The budgetary and financial problems the country is facing will not be cured by band-aids such as this. In fact it will only make matters worse.”

He said O’Neill’s justification for the loan is a lack of foreign exchange, which is crippling business and commerce and leading to increased hardship for ordinary Papua New Guineans such as job losses, rising prices and a collapse in service delivery.

Papua New Guinea seeks IMF loan to ease foreign exchange problems

The move has created a problematic backlog of requests from businesses to access foreign currency for imports.

Prime Minister Peter O'Neill said the loan would be used to clear the foreign exchange requests of major fuel and rice companies.

"The Central Bank is talking to the IMF to create a temporary facility of $US250 million, which they will bring in to make sure they pass it on to the commercial bank," O'Neill said.

"Then [the Central Bank will] make sure they clear up the foreign currency backlog that we have," he added.

PM praises IMF for giving positive feed

A recent IMF report published in the media commended the government for achieving impressive economic growth in recent years.

The IMF projected economic growth for PNG to be robust in 2016, but warns of challenges posed by the sharp drop in commodity prices.

The global financial institution supported the move for PNG to debut the sovereign bond market, urging the government to use the funds raised to improve PNG’s debt profile and fund existing projects and commitments.

IMF downgrades forecast for world, emerging market economies

In a report Tuesday in advance of the IMF-World Bank annual meetings here this week, the fund says the world economy will grow 3.1 percent this year, down from a July forecast of 3.3 percent and from 3.4 percent growth last year.

"The risks seem more tilted to the downside than they did just a few months ago," IMF chief economist Maurice Obstfeld, told reporters.

Still, Obstfeld downplayed the risk of a global recession.

IMF head: Global growth likely to be weaker than expected

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said Asia is still expected to lead global growth, but the pace is slowing with a risk of possibly sagging further because of recent financial market volatility.

Speaking Tuesday in a lecture at the University of Indonesia, Lagarde said the global economic situation will have a significant impact on developing countries, including Indonesia.

FEATURE: China already number one, says the IMF

The IMF’s new data set, released in April with its latest World Economic Outlook report, estimates that in real terms (corrected for price differences, that is), China’s output in 2014 edged ahead of the United States for the first time. There was little between them: assuming its national accounts are correct, China produced goods and services worth US$17.6 trillion, just $198 billion more than US production of US$17.4 trillion.

Tags: