racism

James speaks out against racism

James has been outspoken in opposition of United States president Donald Trump in the past, and continued that on Monday.

He also took time to honour King and the efforts he took to help fight racism and oppression.

"The state of racism will never die, but what we cannot do is allow it to conquer us as people," James said Monday, via ESPN. "We can't allow it to divide us... The guy in control has given people and racism, and negative racism, an opportunity to be out and outspoken without fear.

Chloe Bennet on name change: 'Hollywood is racist'

The "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." star clapped back on social media this week when she was questioned about changing her last name.

"Changing my last name doesn't change the fact that my BLOOD is half Chinese, that I lived in China, speak Mandarin or that I was culturally raised both American and Chinese," she wrote. "It means I had to pay my rent, and Hollywood is racist and wouldn't cast me with a last name that made them uncomfortable."

Jimmy Fallon gets serious about racism

Instead Fallon, at times appearing to fight back tears, spoke from the heart about Saturday's deadly events in Charlottesville, Virginia.

While acknowledging that "The Tonight Show" is not political, Fallon opened up about the clashes in Charlottesville between white nationalists and counterprotesters.

He said it was his "responsibility to stand up against intolerance and extremism."

Make-up artist accused of 'blackface'

The original post, which has now been deleted, came with a disclaimer warning the image was "not about race change".

However another post, using both the image of the model and the original disclaimer, has been uploaded.

The new caption says: "I can't offer an apology for my artwork, and for what I find to be beautiful."

The make-up artist, whose given name is not revealed on his Instagram account, offered an explanation for his decision to use a white model.

This photographer's provocative images challenge the status quo

Over the years his oeuvre has been diverse, ranging from fashion editorials and album covers to social awareness campaigns.

He's perhaps best known for his work with United Colors of Benetton, where he served as artistic director for more than 20 years.

His controversial campaigns addressed subjects such as sexuality, racism, war, capital punishment and AIDS.

Is racism why Adele beat Beyoncé at the Grammys?

When the British pop star tearfully accepted the ceremony's top award Sunday night, she shined a spotlight on the woman she said she has loved since she was 11 years old.

"The artist of my life is Beyoncé, and this album to me, the 'Lemonade' album, was just so monumental," Adele said.

Certainly for her diehard fan base known as the Beyhive -- and for many music critics -- Beyoncé's "Lemonade" was a creative masterpiece.

But with its racial themes and imagery, some are questioning if the project was "just too black" for Grammy voters.

Why a Trump voter came to her rescue

Laila Alawa is a 25-year-old Muslim woman living in D.C. Troy Pflum is a 49-year-old Lutheran man living in Wisconsin.

She's a moderate who voted for Hillary. He's a Republican who voted for Trump.

But Pflum, a truck driver and jewelry salesman, has become an important Twitter ally to Alawa.

The Australian Muslim MP fighting the trolls

Dr Mehreen Faruqi is an Australian Greens Party MP in the New South Wales Upper House, and a former environmental engineer, who fled an "oppressive regime in Pakistan" in 1992 with her husband and infant son.

But she has found herself facing a grotesque cascade of abuse unleashed by internet trolls.

"There is this real vile mix of racism and sexism that is happening within Australia from certain people who don't believe I belong to this country, maybe because of my colour or the religion that I belong to. That is pretty upsetting," Dr Faruqi told the BBC in Sydney.

We don't tip black people, note to Virginia waitress said

Waitress Kelly Carter said a couple had written on the receipt: "Great service don't tip black people."

Owner Tommy Tellez told BBC News the response has been "phenomenal".

People have been dropping by the restaurant to give Ms Carter cash, Mr Tellez said, and a YouCaring campaign has raised over $300 (£245) for her.

Her regular customers have been dropping by to give her hugs.

Tipping is customary in the US, where restaurant servers often earn less than the minimum wage, with tips supposed to make up the difference in pay.

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Victoria's Secret apologizes to customer who says she was racially profiled

Kimberly Houzah says she and another black woman were told to leave the store by someone she thought was a manager. The lingerie giant said the employee is no longer with the company.

In her video, Houzah says the incident started when a third African-American woman was allegedly accused of shoplifting on Wednesday at the store at the Quintard Mall in Oxford. The manager, Houzah says, then told her and a third black woman they needed to leave the store.