Health

The dying process: What to expect when someone is close to death

The majority of deaths on screen are violent, bloody, traumatic affairs, with few realistic portrayals of what a death from illness or so-called "natural causes" actually looks like.

Little wonder we have such a fear of death, and especially of being in the presence of it.

It's still a terrifying notion, because most of us have no idea what we will see.

My own curiosity about death led me to write a book on the topic.

In bringing together medical research and personal stories from those who've undergone near-death experiences, I learned a lot.

Are you an addict? Turns out we're all tech junkies

Chances are you're looking at it right now.

Before you try and deny you're addicted, here are some stats to consider:

Australian men unlock their phones more than anyone in the world - on average 45 to 46 times a day, while for Australian women it is around 42 times.

Those figures have been calculated by AntiSocial, an app developed by Melbourne software company Bugbean, to monitor people's use of social media.

Remote villages get access to health awareness

The awareness was on family planning, Tuberculosis (TB) and the dangers of illegal drugs, alcohol abuse and violence.

The Oil Search Foundation (OSF) working with Maries Stopes and the Pimaga District Hospital staff organised a two-day health patrol last month that delivered health services and awareness to the schools and communities.

The eight-person team provided immunisation for children, general outpatient screening, antenatal clinics for pregnant mothers, family planning services, HIV testing and distributed treated Mosquito nets.

Is chocolate good or bad for health?

But in case you need one more reason (or 10) to celebrate chocolate, just look to science. Studies of chocolate lovers -- and even some self-proclaimed "chocoholics" -- suggest that it could lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease, help control blood sugar and slash stress, and on and on.

No fruit juice for kids under 1, pediatricians advise

The group had previously advised parents to wait to offer juice until a child reached 6 months old but decided to make the change based on rising rates of obesity and concerns about tooth cavities.

What’s in your drinking water?

Why would you care anyway…water is water and does the same thing, right? Wrong!

According to Michelle Tempongko Jones, it’s not.

She is a naturopath, herbalist, nutritionist, iridologist, anti-ageing practitioner and wellness coach.

Of course the uses for water remain the same, but not its effect when consumed.

All bottled water have different levels of properties, as well as tap water, depending what area it is from.

Women on the Move

Women on the Move is one of such group, started by Lady Nii Cragnolini four years ago to provide an avenue for women to feel comfortable and safe about health and fitness.

The initiative initially began as a walking group.

For the last two years now, the group has expanded in all areas.

Xenia Peni is a volunteer and committee in this group.

She says WOTM now provides health and fitness advice and other sessions such as step aerobics and strength and conditioning workouts. It is also open to men and has received children who come in with family.

Chris Cornell's family disputes preliminary suicide finding

The city's medical examiner said 52-year-old Cornell — the lead singer in Soundgarden and Audioslave — died early Thursday morning after performing at a concert on Wednesday night.

But Cornell's family said without toxicology test results completed they do not know what caused his death.

On Friday, an official said the results of a full autopsy and toxicology tests could take days before they are completed and released.

Endocrine disrupting chemicals: Is your home making you sick?

Obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some cancer rates are on the rise in humans. While sperm count and fertility is on a downward slide in some populations. What if chemical exposure was partly responsible for these trends?

One hypothesis is that a group of chemicals — known as 'endocrine disrupting chemicals' (EDCSs) — could affect human reproduction, puberty, metabolism and other functions controlled by hormones in our endocrine system.

Many suspected EDCs are already in your home — but how much risk do they really pose? At what exposure level do they become unsafe?

Red Cross trials frozen blood to deploy in conflict zones

The technology, which was pioneered in the Netherlands, dramatically extends the shelf life of blood components for up to 10 years.

The blood service said it was critical to have a constant supply in field hospitals, but the technique also has huge benefits for rural and remote communities.

In Australia one in three people need blood, but only one in 30 donate it.