Twitter

US man held for sending flashing tweet to epileptic writer

John Rayne Rivello, 29, of Maryland, sent Kurt Eichenwald an animated image with a flashing light on Twitter in December, causing the seizure.

He has been charged with criminal cyber stalking and could face a 10-year sentence, the New York Times reports.

"You deserve a seizure for your post," he is alleged to have written.

Mr Eichenwald is known to have epilepsy. He is a senior writer at Newsweek magazine, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and a best-selling author of books including The Informant.

'Let's see if he dies'

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'Huge advance' in fighting world's biggest killer

The results of the large international trial on 27,000 patients means the drug could soon be used by millions.

The British Heart Foundation said the findings were a significant advance in fighting the biggest killer in the world.

Around 15 million people die each year from heart attacks or stroke.

Bad cholesterol is the villain in heart world - it leads to blood vessels furring up, becoming easy to block which fatally starves the heart or brain of oxygen.

It is why millions of people take drugs called statins to reduce the amount of bad cholesterol.

Top Twitter accounts vandalized with Nazi symbols

Several prominent Twitter accounts were vandalized early Wednesday by hackers who posted images of the Turkish flag along with anti-German and anti-Dutch messages.

He was president when Twitter was banned; now he's tweeting

After his re-election in 2009, anti-government protesters used Twitter to help coordinate and organize the Green Movement, sometimes called the "Twitter revolution."

Iran's leaders responded by blocking access to Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites. Ordinary Iranian citizens still were able to access Twitter using illegal VPN software.

Former India cricketer 'trolls' student

Gurmehar Kaur has been receiving threats and abuse after her campaign against a right-wing student union.

But, Sehwag's tweet was directed at an earlier campaign, when she said her father, a soldier who died in Kargil, was killed by war, not Pakistan.

He tweeted a picture of himself holding a sign saying, "I did not score two triple centuries, my bat did."

It has been retweeted more than 20,000 times and received 33,000 "likes" since then, with many, including Bollywood actor Randeep Hooda praising the tweet.

Bana Alabed visits Syrian boy who lost legs in bombing

Bana Alabed, the 7-year-old girl whose Twitter updates during last year's brutal siege of Aleppo drew global attention, tweeted a video of herself meeting Abdel Basit Al-Satouf at a hospital in Turkey and taking the boy gifts.

"Yeeeeeeeeeeeees I am very happy, I'm meeting (Abdel Basit) the Syrian boy who lost both legs to bombing," she said.

Twitter rolls out new anti-abuse tools

It comes in the wake of heavy criticism about harassment on its platform and a failure to find a buyer after months of rumours about takeovers.

It has announced three main changes, which will be rolled out in the "coming weeks".

It includes moves to identify people who have been permanently suspended and stop them creating new accounts.

Harassment

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Twitter staff give $1m to fight Trump order

The ACLU has pledged to fight President Donald Trump's temporary ban on refugees and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries.

The civil rights group has reportedly raised more than $24m in online donations in the past few days.

Taxi hailing company Lyft previously said that it would donate $1m to the ACLU over the next four years.

Why a Trump voter came to her rescue

Laila Alawa is a 25-year-old Muslim woman living in D.C. Troy Pflum is a 49-year-old Lutheran man living in Wisconsin.

She's a moderate who voted for Hillary. He's a Republican who voted for Trump.

But Pflum, a truck driver and jewelry salesman, has become an important Twitter ally to Alawa.

Massive networks of fake accounts found on Twitter

The largest network ties together more than 350,000 accounts and further work suggests others may be even bigger.

UK researchers accidentally uncovered the lurking networks while probing Twitter to see how people use it.

Some of the accounts have been used to fake follower numbers, send spam and boost interest in trending topics.

 

Hidden purpose