stock market

Stock market shakes of an early stumble, ends higher

Chevron jumped 4 percent, the most in the Dow Jones industrial average. Exxon Mobil also gained 3 percent.

Energy stocks climbed as the price of oil turned higher, shaking off a two-day slump. U.S. crude gained 2 percent.

Banks and other financial stocks were the only sector to fall.

The Dow gained 200 points, or 1.2 percent, to 16,472. It was down as much as 258 earlier.

Stocks, dollar sink after weak jobs report augurs low rates

Bond prices jumped Friday, sending yields down, as investors expected the new sign of weakness in the U.S. would push any interest rate hike further out into the future.

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 233 points, or 1.4 percent, to 16,044 as of 9:35 a.m. Eastern time.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 24 points, or 1.3 percent, to 1,898. The Nasdaq composite declined 55 points, or 1.2 percent, to 4,572.

US stocks fall sharply on China growth worries

The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 312 points, or 1.9 percent, to 16,001 Monday.

The Standard & Poor's 500 index sank 49 points, or 2.6 percent, to 1,881. The Nasdaq composite lost 142 points, or 3 percent, to 4,543.

Biotechnology stocks, until recently a high-flying sector, continued to drop sharply.

US stocks open higher, led by gains for financial stocks

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 100 points, or 0.6 percent, to 16,485 as of 9:38 a.m. Eastern time Monday.

The Standard & Poor's 500 climbed 11 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,969 and the Nasdaq composite gained 28 points, or 0.6 percent, to 4,857.

The stock market is steadying after the Federal Reserve decided last week to keep its benchmark interest rate on hold, raising concerns about the outlook for global growth.

Energy stocks rise sharply as price of oil spikes

The price of oil jumped almost 6 percent Wednesday following a drop in crude inventories last week that was much steeper than analysts were expecting.

Chevron and Exxon Mobil were among the biggest gainers in the Dow Jones industrial average.

Anheuser-Busch InBev jumped 7 percent after the company made a takeover approach to SABMiller, the owner of Miller and Peroni. Other beer makers also rose.

Fed vice chair in spotlight as markets seek rate hike clues

The market's ride and how the Fed will react provide the backdrop for the annual high-profile economic conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Fed Chair Janet Yellen decided to skip this year's meeting, so Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer is commanding top attention, with investors eagerly parsing his every word.

Fischer's message: Incoming economic data and market developments over the next two weeks will play crucial roles in determining whether the Fed raises interest rates at its September meeting.

US stocks extend recovery after Chinese market surges

However, the major stock indexes gave up a large part of their early gains with less than an hour to go of regular trading, reminding investors that the markets remain volatile.

US stocks jump as oil's bounce boosts energy stocks

Energy stocks jumped, following the price of oil higher. Crude rebounded after dropping to its lowest level of the year in early trading. Industrial stocks also climbed sharply after Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway agreed to buy Precision Castparts, a maker of industrial components, for $32 billion.

Greek stock market bloodbath as exchange reopens

Bank shares suffered most, hitting or nearing the daily trading limit of a 30 percent loss.

"There's a sense of panic," said Evangelos Sioutis, financial analyst and head of equities at Guardian Trust. He noted some traders are selling stock merely to raise cash because there is so little liquidity in the Greek economy.

"There are no buyers," he said. "The outlook is not clear."

Nasdaq logs best week in nearly nine months as Google jumps

It was a quiet end to an eventful week. Markets around the world rallied on Monday after Greece and its creditors agreed to a broad framework for a new loan program. Stronger quarterly earnings reports from a range of big U.S. companies, including Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase, added more encouragement.

"It appears the sky is clearing," said Linda Duessel, senior equity strategist at Federated Investors.