Hawaii

Man hit by lava in first serious Kilauea injury

The injured man was sitting on a balcony at his home when "lava spatter" - projectile molten rock - landed on him.

"It hit him on the shin and shattered everything there down on his leg," a spokeswoman for the county mayor said.

Lava spatters can weigh "as much a refrigerator", she told Reuters.

The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island erupted at the beginning of May, and the situation for residents has steadily been worsening.

Preparedness urged in Hawaii as volcano threat shifts

People on Big Island are preparing for the worst as officials urge communities in high risk areas to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice.

Kilauea's official volcano threat was raised from orange to red over the past two days, as the summit's crater showed signs that a more violent eruption could follow.

Civil defense is urging locals to remain vigilant and heed warnings, with people being informed about designated evacuation centres.

Thousands of people have already evacuated their homes after the eruption destroyed around 30 structures in the past two weeks.

New fissure opens up on Kilauea

Nearly 2,000 people have been evacuated since the volcano erupted May 3, sending lava flowing into communities and threatening a nearby geothermal plant.

An 18th fissure, a crack on the ground through which lava pours out, was reported Sunday, according to the Civil Defense Emergency System for the County of Hawaii.

The Department of Public Works and Police said the new fissure opened on Hale Kamahina Loop Road and is emitting steam and lava.

Nearly 2000 evacuated away from Hawaii volcano

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said a new fissure had spewed lava up to 70 metres into the air and new cracks had opened on a highway about 19 kilometres from where the Kilauea volcano erupted on Friday.

The southeast corner of the Big Island was rocked by a 6.9 tremor on Saturday, and more earthquakes and eruptions are expected.

State officials said the lava eruptions are far from tourist areas, and is business as usual on the rest of the island.

Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, has been in constant eruption for 35 years.

Rescue and evacuation efforts ongoing in Hawaii after floods

It has also caused damage to parts of neighbouring Oahu.

The state's Red Cross is busy delivering emergency aid to people, many of whom are in evacuatiion centres.

Record flash flooding and severe thunderstorms over the weekend turned roads to waterways and triggered mudslides, while there were widespread power and water shut downs.

In some cases access to emergency shelters was blocked.

Hawaii residents and vacationers run for cover, fearing missile attack

"You're thinking, 'Oh my gosh, are we going to die? Is it really a missile (headed) our way, or is it just a test?'" the 24-year-old told CNN. "We really didn't know."

Minutes before, she'd received an ominous alert on her phone.

"BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL."

Azbell, her boyfriend and hundreds of other hotel guests were "herded like cows" into the basement by staff. "People are crying and people obviously were super scared," she said.

Hawaii dusts off nuclear attack warning siren

The resumption of the monthly tests comes amid a growing threat from North Korea's missile and nuclear programme.

Pyongyang has tested a series of ballistic missiles and in September carried out its sixth nuclear test.

Hawaii, in the Pacific, already has a monthly test of sirens warning of natural disasters, including tsunamis.

The nuclear attack signal uses a different, wavering tone, warning residents and tourists to stay indoors and await further instructions.

Hawaii to test nuclear alerts

The administrator for the State Emergency Management Agency, Vern Miyagi, said the sirens would notify the public to "get inside, stay inside and stay tuned" for more information.

Mr Miyagi said the increased threat from North Korea was the reason behind the warnings.

The Pacific Daily News reported the signal test would take place on Friday and then the first business day of each month thereafter.

The state is also broadcasting public service announcements and conducting community meetings aimed at educating the public.

Stolen Spam used like currency in Hawaii

Tina Yamaki said thefts of Spam had escalated since a recent law change on the value of stolen goods defining a crime.

She said organised criminals appeared to be involved, with entire cases of Spam taken in some of the heists.

Ms Yamaki said the cans were often then sold out of the back of cars, at swap meets and some people are using Spam as currency and bartering for drugs with it.

Amnesty supports Hawaii on travel ban stance

Last month, the US Supreme Court let the Trump administration's executive order banning people from six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days go forward with a limited scope.

The restrictions ban grandparents.

The state had filed a motion in the US District Court hoping to include grandparents and other relatives, but that was rejected on Friday.

The chair of Amnesty International Hawaii Beatriz Cantelmo said the ban was discriminatory and very dangerous.