France

200 detonators, explosives stolen from French military site

The thefts at the Miramas site, which is operated by a combination of military services west of Marseille, appeared to have occurred overnight from Sunday to Monday. The break-in comes as France has strengthened its security measures after two deadly attacks by extremists this year.

Marseille prosecutor Brice Robin said an investigation has started on charges of "theft with break-in carried out by a criminal group" and "fraudulent entry into a military compound."

Embassy warns Americans in France to be vigilant

The embassy released a statement Friday night urging Americans to report suspicious activities and stay away from any security incidents.

It also noted that French authorities have increased the terrorism alert level in recent months since attacks in January in Paris left 17 victims and three Islamic attackers dead, so there are more troops and police in the streets than in previous years.

And French prosecutors say the suspect who they believe attacked a U.S. gas plant in France is a local truck driver who was known to workers at the Air Products plant.

VIDEO: EU foreign policy chief on French and Tunisian attacks

She said the attacks could only unite Europe and the Arab world not divide them, and that a united response would be needed.

THE LATEST: All workers accounted for after attack, says factory management

Air Products says all its employees are accounted for after an attack on a factory in southeastern France. It has not confirmed whether its staff were among the two people reported injured and one dead. The company says in a statement that all employees have been evacuated from the site, which is secure.

It says "our crisis and emergency response teams have been activated and are working closely with all relevant authorities."

Beheading, explosion at factory in France; suspects captured

Two people were injured, authorities said.

President Francois Hollande, speaking in Brussels, said the attack began shortly before 10 a.m. when a car crashed through the gate of a gas factory in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, southeast of Lyon. The car then plowed into gas canisters, touching off an explosion, he said.

"No doubt about the intention — to cause an explosion," Hollande said, calling the attack "of a terrorist nature."

French woman goes on trial for deaths of 8 of her babies

When he summoned the police, they found the body of another newborn. A few days later, they found more bags in the garage — with six additional small corpses.

Police contacted the house's previous owners, and quickly discovered the horrifying explanation: Frenchwoman Dominique Cottrez confessed to secretly bearing and then killing eight of her newborns, saying she feared they were children of a long, incestuous relationship with her father.

France calls in US envoy over spying, holds security meeting

The release of the spying revelations appeared to be timed to coincide with a final vote Wednesday in the French Parliament on a bill allowing broad new surveillance powers, in particular to counter terrorism threats.

French President Hollande, calling the U.S. spying an "unacceptable" security breach, convened two emergency meetings as a result of the disclosures about the NSA's spying. 

The first was with France's top security officials, the second with leading legislators, many of whom have already voted for the new surveillance measure.

VIDEO: Police arrest suspected people smugglers

Dramatic footage taken by the State Investigation and Protection Agency, SIPA, showed police raiding a house in the city of Zenica and arresting at least four suspects.

A police statement said on Tuesday that for years the suspects forced their victims to go pickpocketing for them in France while mistreating them physically and psychologically.

Police estimate the suspects made over 2 million euros (2.23 million US dollars), which they spent on real estate purchases and luxury cars.