Prime Minister presents treaty for ratification

Prime Minister James Marape today, tabled the submission of the ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).

Since it opened for signature on 24th of September 1996, Papua New Guinea was amongst the first states to sign the comprehensive test ban treaty, but remains to date one of the only 10 states that have yet to ratify it.

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is a multilateral treaty opened for signature in 1996 by which states agree to ban all nuclear explosions in all environments, for military or civilian purposes.

“Within the region, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Island and Tonga are the only Pacific Island Forum nations yet to ratify the treaty,” said PM Marape.

Marape says Papua New Guinea’s commitment as a country towards ratifying this treaty is important because of the emerging trans-national geo-political security threats.

“We cannot deny the fact that nuclear weapons production and accumulation is slowing or has ceased nor should we anticipate a total nuclear free world in a few centuries ahead knowing the quantity already in the possession of countries around the world today,” he stated further.

Marape says once enforced, the comprehensive nuclear ban treaty is anticipated to ban all forms of nuclear weapon testing in the world. So far, 186 nations have signed and 176 have ratified it. It is also unfortunate that this treaty will not enter into force until it is ratified by all the other 44 countries in the world that either produce or process or have in their possession nuclear weapons.

“Of the 44, 8 of them are China, India, Pakistan, North Korea, Israel, Iran, Egypt, and the United States have yet to ratify the treaty. Despite lack of corporation from these countries ample progress has been made by the rest of the signatories towards the universalization of the treaty.”

The Prime Minister says the importance of this treaty is also to provide an opportunity for Papua New Guinea to review and consolidate technical cooperation especially in building national capacity in the international monitoring system and data for civil and scientific applications, and disasters risk management seismic activity monitoring, early tsunami warning alerts, volcanic activities monitoring and climate change research.

“Our commitment as a country towards ratifying this treaty is important because of the emerging trans-national geo-political security threats. We cannot deny the fact that nuclear weapons production and accumulation is slowing or has ceased nor should we anticipate a total nuclear free world in a few centuries ahead knowing the quantity already in the possession of countries around the world today.

“However, that said, fulfilling our domestic process this makes our efforts to work together with rest of the world towards finding a more controlled and safer alternatives and the use of nuclear technology to benefit humanity and the environment in the long run,” stated Prime Minister Marape.

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