UNAIDS

Journalists awarded

Among them were four female journalists who were awarded for their coverage of the sensitive issues.

Every year, UN Women and UNAIDS organise the Media Awards for Excellence in Reporting on HIV and Gender-Based Violence.

This is to recognise the high standard of balanced sensitive reporting by local media personnel on GBV and HIV issues in Papua New Guinea.

Under this year’s theme of ‘Hear My Voice! My Story!’, four female journalists and a Yumi Sanap Strong representative were awarded on November 5th.

Government must increase funding to support programs

This was stressed yesterday by Cardinal Sir John Ribat at the opening of the first ever HIV Summit for PNG Christian Leaders Alliance on HIV and AIDS at the Stanley Hotel.

Cardinal Ribat said the PNG Christian Leaders Alliance on HIV and AIDS is an association of heads of churches who have joined forces to demonstrate their leadership support and commitment towards addressing root causes of HIV.

“This includes other related issues or cross cutting issues in PNG,” he said.

Entries for UNAIDS Media Awards open

The Awards will recognize excellence in reporting on HIV and Gender Based Violence issues where in 2015 was launched as a collaboration between UNAIDS and UN Women.

The 2016 is expected to be an even more exciting and rewarding than the 2015 inaugural awards for reporters who want to make a positive change related to such issue in our communities.

UN Women wants to recognize this achievement with the Annual Awards and in addition, there will also be an Award for the best editorial column in PNG of which was award to Post-Courier last year.

Rates of HIV in Pacific going down, says UN

According to RNZI, the director of the Asia and Pacific region for UNAIDS, Steve Kraus, said Papua New Guinea still accounts for 95 percent of people living with the virus in the Pacific.

He said that throughout the Asia-Pacific region, 5 million people have HIV but overall new infections are declining.

Steve Kraus said people's mobility contributes to the spread of the virus, but discrimination stops people from being tested.