Supreme Court

Connecticut court bars execution of 11 death row inmates

In a sharply divided 4-3 ruling, the court declared the death penalty violates the state's constitution, "no longer comports with contemporary standards of decency and no longer serves any legitimate penological purpose."

Maladina’s rare application refused

Chief Justice Sir Salamo Injia who is sitting as a single Supreme Court judge refused and dismissed Maladina’s application today.

The bid was for an interim order to stay the criminal proceedings in the National Court pending determination of an appeal against his conviction.

Leave was granted on July 5 to appeal against his conviction on the ground that the trial judge convicted the prisoner who is out on bail on circumstantial or indirect evidence before his court.

Ruling on Maladina’s application today

 Maladina is seeking an interim order to put off his sentencing that is scheduled for July 15 before Deputy Chief Justice Gibbs Salika.

He went before Chief Justice Sir Salamo Injia who is sitting as a single Supreme Court judge on July 6 seeking a stay against the National Court sentencing of him next Wednesday.

His application comes after the Supreme Court on Friday July 3 granted leave to Maladina to appeal his conviction on the ground that the trial judge, Deputy Chief Justice Sir Gibbs Salika, convicted Maladina on indirect evidence.

Maladina seeks order against sentencing

 Maladina went before the Chief Justice Sir Salamo Injia this afternoon (July 6) seeking a stay against the National Court sentencing him on July 15.

Sir Salamo will make a ruling on the application on Wednesday (July 08).

The Chief Justice, in hearing the application from Maladina’s lawyer Greg Sheppard, said such application was the first of such going before the Supreme Court before sentencing in his 20 year experience at the courts.

Obama hails 'thunderbolt' gay marriage ruling

The president, in a Rose Garden statement, said the court ruling has "made our union a little more perfect."

Vanuatu opposition confident motion will go ahead

The Supreme Court this week declared a decision by the newly-appointed speaker of parliament, Marcellino Pipite, to rule out the opposition's motion of no confidence against the new prime minister Sato Kilman, and ordered parliament to reconvene on Tuesday to hear it.
 

Reaction to the Supreme Court's health care decision

"Today, after more than 50 votes in Congress to repeal or weaken this law, after a presidential election based in part on preserving or repealing this law, after multiple challenges to this law before the Supreme Court — the Affordable Care Act is here to stay." — Obama, speaking in the Rose Garden.

Supreme Court upholds nationwide health care law subsidies

The justices said in a 6-3 ruling that the subsidies that 8.7 million people currently receive to make insurance affordable do not depend on where they live, as opponents contended.

The outcome was the second major victory for Obama in politically charged Supreme Court tests of his most significant domestic achievement. And it came the same day the court gave him an unexpected victory by preserving a key tool the administration uses to fight housing bias.

The Latest: Supreme Court upholds Obama's health care subsidies

The justices said in a 6-3 ruling Thursday that the subsidies that 8.7 million people currently receive to make insurance affordable do not depend on where they live, under the 2010 health care law.

Micah’s second attempt to avoid tribunal

A similar order was refused by the National court earlier.

His lawyers Mal Varitimos (QC) and Nelson Saroa, argued that the Ombudsman Commission acted beyond its jurisdiction by not giving Micah the opportunity to respond to further investigation information after his first response in August 2014.

Varitomos said there were subsequent events that led to additional information through summons issued to the Managing Directors of IPBC and Grand Papua Hotel where the allegations arose.