Sugar

Mom's sweet tooth may be linked to child's allergies, study says

The researchers looked at allergies that produce respiratory and skin symptoms, including dust mites, cats and grass. "Allergic asthma" causes breathing problems, like wheezing and coughing, in the presence of common allergens such as dust.

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London used data gathered from nearly 9,000 mother-child pairs in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, an ongoing research project that tracks the health of families with children born between April 1, 1991, and December 31, 1992.

One-month sugar detox: A nutritionist explains how and why

But whether you've considered juicing, fasting or cleansing in an effort to lose weight or improve your well-being, you're probably aware that drastically cutting out foods is not effective as a long-term lifestyle approach to healthy eating.

In fact, strict detoxing can cause issues including fatigue, dizziness and low blood sugar.

But there is one kind of sustainable detox that is worthwhile, according to some experts. Reducing sugar in your diet can help you drop pounds, improve your health and even give you more radiant skin.

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Diet sodas may be tied to stroke, dementia risk

Artificially sweetened drinks, such as diet sodas, were tied to a higher risk of stroke and dementia in the study, which published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke on Thursday.

The study sheds light only on an association, as the researchers were unable to determine an actual cause-and-effect relationship between sipping artificially sweetened drinks and an increased risk for stroke and dementia. Therefore, some experts caution that the findings should be interpreted carefully.

Easter egg calculator: How guilty should you feel about your binge?

This happens another five times and it isn't even lunchtime on Good Friday yet.

Before you know it, you've eaten more than 20 teaspoons of sugar, and that's on top of your regular diet.

It's a common story in the holiday period — especially one increasingly wedded to particular snack foods. So how guilty should you actually feel about it?

First, the scary part about sugar

KPMG performance coach and fitness fiend Andrew May crunched the numbers on the sugar content of the popular Easter items, and it's not great reading.

Is fruit juice healthy?

A glass of fresh orange or grapefruit juice with breakfast isn't just refreshing. It also delivers a healthy dose of vitamin C and potassium, which can be especially helpful if you tend to forgo fruit. Some store-bought juices are fortified with bone-building calcium, too.

But even when it contains only naturally occurring fructose from whole fruit and no added sugars to boost sweetness, fruit juice is still a concentrated source of sugar and calories, which can be problematic for those watching their weight or blood sugar.

What happens to your brain when you give up sugar

My friend and fellow graduate student Andrew is equally afflicted, and living in Hershey, Pennsylvania -- the "Chocolate Capital of the World" -- doesn't help either of us.

But Andrew is braver than I am. Last year, he gave up sweets for Lent. I can't say that I'm following in his footsteps this year, but if you are abstaining from sweets for Lent this year, here's what you can expect over the next 40 days.

Sugar: natural reward, unnatural fix

Fruit and veg: For a longer life eat 10-a-day

The study, by Imperial College London, calculated such eating habits could prevent 7.8 million premature deaths each year.

The team also identified specific fruit and veg that reduced the risk of cancer and heart disease.

The analysis showed even small amounts had a health boon, but more is even better.

A portion counts as 80g (3oz) of fruit or veg - the equivalent of a small banana, a pear or three heaped tablespoons of spinach or peas.

The conclusions were made by pooling data on 95 separate studies, involving two million people's eating habits.

Sugar is dangerous than alcohol, tobacco: Juffa

Juffa said sugar was just as bad if not more dangerous then tobacco and cigarette and harms and kills more Papua New Guineans then tobacco and alcohol combined.

He added that the national health cost and toll on the human resources of the nation was significant and could not be ignored.

Juffa said Mexico had imposed such a tax and was now reaping dual benefits of an improving overall national health for its people and increased revenues.

How big sugar covered up health dangers

But why did it take so long for researchers to inspect this link?

new historical analysis published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday claims that the sugar industry sponsored research that cast doubt about sugar's health risks and promoted fat "as the dietary culprit" in heart disease -- and didn't disclose it.

One can of fizzy drink daily 'can increase heart attack risk by a third'

Just one can of fizzy drink a day can increase the risk of heart attack by a third and dramatically raise the chance of diabetes and stroke, the largest ever study has found.

The research by Harvard school of public health found that regularly drinking sugary drinks increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by a quarter (26 per cent), the risk of heart attack or fatal heart disease by a third (35 per cent) and the risk of stroke by a sixth (16 per cent).