People

Changing careers midlife: People share their success stories

People changing careers mid-life face ageism and financial uncertainty, but it can be done.

Here are some success stories from ABC Radio Melbourne listeners.

From disillusioned to energised

When Brunswick East resident Chris had his 45th birthday, he realised he was closer to 50 than he was to 40.

"I was in the corporate world for a while, over 10 years, and I just became a bit disillusioned."

How I prepared my son for the death of his mum

It's a heartbreaking sentence to hear from a six-year-old.

When Tina was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer in 2010, five months after Lucas was born, she and her husband Aaron were devastated.

But after chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery and hormone therapy, she was as doctors called her "a miracle" and well for another three years — until the cancer returned.

"We were married for almost 14 years," Aaron said.

"I was worried Tina would never hear Lucas say his first words, call her mum ... that she would die before he had fully developed that bond.

Arnhem Land rapper inspiring young people

And with the release of his track Cloud 9, which features the 20-year-old rapping in Yolngu Matha, he's on his way.

Baker Boy, also known as Danzel Baker, is from Milingimbi community in north-eastern Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory.

He has a distinguished cultural pedigree — the Djuki Mala dancer is related to up-and-coming musicians Garruwa and Yirrmal, and hails from a part of the country that has produced major Australian acts such as Yothu Yindi and Gurrumul.

Heart attack shock for one half of Queensland music duo Busby Marou

The 34-year-old — one half of Busby Marou — was playing touch football in Rockhampton last week when he started feeling light-headed.

"I just thought I was puffed and unfit," he said.

"There was tightening across my chest ... it was all the things I had read about, all the signs.

"I still didn't think that was it, but I had a good crew around me that got me to the hospital."

Dance me to the end of adulthood

From leg irons to tap dancing

David Watson, 83, took up tap dancing in his 40s, and has danced ever since.

He took up it up by chance, after accompanying a friend from work to a dance class in Melbourne.

The ex-architecture lecturer recalled the very first lesson on a "lousy" floor located above a porn shop in Swanston Street.

"I used to have to hide my face as I walked in," Mr Watson laughed.

Australia's first celebrity chef is also an artist

This week his food and wind-themed exhibition opens in Cheltenham in Melbourne.

"Not wind made by the food, but musical instruments," he said.

The 82-year-old recalled his first encounter with art while sitting in a highchair and using baby food to paint the walls.

"My mother who was an intelligent young mother realised that there was some art there," he said.

"She encouraged me to mix spinach with this farex just to put a bit of texture and colour with it and I've sort of being going on the same sort of way ever since."

Fashion label Magpie Goose showcases traditional Top End Aboriginal paint

Artist Mario Munkara points out the different design elements of the printed ceremonial pukumani burial poles, representing various styles of body painting and scarification used during funeral ceremonies.

"They used to have the scars around their chests, and the ladies used to have it on their breasts and shoulder," he says.

"Pukumani pole is traditional way for us when we carve, to think about our sorrow and the person who passed away."

Why Bolivian hunter-gatherers have the healthiest arteries

She was, it turned out, a 3,500-year-old Egyptian princess, her mummified skin leathery brown, her coffin over 10 feet long and lavishly carved.

But when researchers slid Princess Ahmose Meryet-Amon’s body into a CT scanner, they found, at least in one respect, she was not so different from some 92 million un-royal Americans: Her arteries were hardened and blocked by plaque. The researchers also examined the shriveled blood vessels of over 100 other mummies from Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest, and the Aleutian Islands — and found similar signs of cardiovascular disease.

Recent rain causes flooding in Central Province

If you cannot adapt, you either move to a more suitable environment or you lose the battle of survival.

In PNG where weather can be unpredictable at times, it has become a game of nature versus man

And like many who live near a river, when raining season is on, the people of Laloki along the Hiritano highway, Central Province have to be on alert. Because, any time now, it may flood!

The last couple of days has been good on Port Moresby.

However, the continuous rain has put those residing along the riverside on the downside.

Exploring the emotional toll of being disabled in first solo art exhibition

But at the age of 28, he slowly found himself struggling to walk up stairs and get out of low furniture.

He was diagnosed with a degenerative neuromuscular condition called inclusion body myositis.

The disease causes Mr Grant's muscles to waste away to the point that he may one day struggle to breathe and swallow.

"To a degree there was a loss of identity," he said.

"I used to love riding motorbikes, sailing and working on cars and bushwalking and doing active things.