Health

Govt signs health deals

The first is a K41 million (AUD$18 million) grant from the Australian Government for the continuation of the Rural Primary Health Service Delivery Project.

The second is a concessional loan from the Czechoslovakia EXIM Bank for K172 million (Euro 55 million) for the upgrading of the Boram Hospital in East Sepik Province.

Acting Prime Minister, Charles Abel, said the signing represents the ongoing commitment of the Government towards the health sector.

Govt warned of tragic health consequences

Shadow Minister for Health and HIV/AIDS, Joseph Yopyyopy, said this was in view of the fact that PNG’s health system is already fragile and under-resourced.

He said the funding reductions in PNG’s health sector since 2015 would bring even the most robust health system to its knees.

The warning comes as the Government prepares to table PNG’s 2018 money plan tomorrow (Nov 28) in Parliament.

“PNG’s health expenditure has been radically reduced during the past two years, compounding people’s miseries nationwide in a health system that is already desperately struggling.

PJV launches pilot hand wash program for Porgera schools

The awareness which uses soap as a key approach to disease prevention is targeted toward school-aged children who are the most vulnerable to disease outbreaks in the communities.

PJV’s Community Development Section (CDS) under the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Department facilitated the first hand washing program at the Kairik Primary and Porgera Station Elementary Schools on 26 and 27 October.

Free health care to be reviewed

He made note of the allocated budget, saying it was an issue to be discussed.

Weighing options now, a very small standard fee may be established, particularly for emergencies, Loop PNG was told.

“So that the patient is not compromised because of the user fees. But still, subsidised specialist care and free primary health care still remains,” he said.

The free primary health care program was launched by the government in 2014.

(Loop file pic)

New health registration system launched

A new method of storing data electronically will be launched today, doing away with the paper based system previously used.

The Health Care Practitioner Registration System database will contain the details of all the nurses and midwives in the country that are fit to practice. This will also include new overseas nurses and midwives who come to PNG to work.

With the paper based system, PNG Nursing Council said individuals were recorded more than once, or nurses and midwives who had retired or moved away were still on the record.

'Handful of changes' make cancer

The team, at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, showed the answer was a tiny handful, between one and 10 mutations depending on the type of tumour.

It has been one of the most hotly debated issues in cancer science for decades.

The findings, published in the journal Cell, could improve treatment for patients.

If you played spot the difference between a cancer and healthy tissue, you could find tens of thousands of differences - or mutations - in the DNA.

‘If you are fit and healthy, you’ll do anything’

The MINTT colour walk today was another initiative to promote the safe and healthy city concept in the nation’s capital.

The launch of the MINTT 4G smartphone was incorporated with Sunday Walk for Life. A shorter version of course.

It started at 7am from the Hubert Murray stadium, down past the harbour city, following the ring road and back to the stadium.

NCD Governor Powes Parkop was impressed with the turnout.

Avoid being infected by gruesome flesh-eating bacteria

She was said to have caught it on Victoria's Mornington Peninsula, where cases seem to be on the rise.

Buruli ulcer, also known as Bairnsdale ulcer, occurs in many areas of the world, including Victoria.

Love, audibility

Whether they are a man or a woman, the best way to find out if the object of your crush returns your affections is probably just to talk to them.

But in judging whether there's a spark between you, what they are saying may not be as important as how they say it.

Dr Marina Kalashnikova, a speech and language researcher at the University of Western Sydney, said research had shown people's voices "carry a lot of information" about their feelings towards the person they're conversing with.

Have humans always slept through the night?

But the notion that we need all of our sleep in one unbroken block, is not necessarily driven by our biology. And there's a good deal of evidence to show we haven't always had this approach to sleep.

In Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century text, The Squire's Tale, the king's daughter, Canacee, is described as having a "fyrste sleep," arising in the early morning ahead of her companions, who sleep fully through the night.