Hawaii

Rescue and evacuation efforts ongoing in Hawaii after floods

It has also caused damage to parts of neighbouring Oahu.

The state's Red Cross is busy delivering emergency aid to people, many of whom are in evacuatiion centres.

Record flash flooding and severe thunderstorms over the weekend turned roads to waterways and triggered mudslides, while there were widespread power and water shut downs.

In some cases access to emergency shelters was blocked.

Hawaii residents and vacationers run for cover, fearing missile attack

"You're thinking, 'Oh my gosh, are we going to die? Is it really a missile (headed) our way, or is it just a test?'" the 24-year-old told CNN. "We really didn't know."

Minutes before, she'd received an ominous alert on her phone.

"BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL."

Azbell, her boyfriend and hundreds of other hotel guests were "herded like cows" into the basement by staff. "People are crying and people obviously were super scared," she said.

Hawaii dusts off nuclear attack warning siren

The resumption of the monthly tests comes amid a growing threat from North Korea's missile and nuclear programme.

Pyongyang has tested a series of ballistic missiles and in September carried out its sixth nuclear test.

Hawaii, in the Pacific, already has a monthly test of sirens warning of natural disasters, including tsunamis.

The nuclear attack signal uses a different, wavering tone, warning residents and tourists to stay indoors and await further instructions.

Hawaii to test nuclear alerts

The administrator for the State Emergency Management Agency, Vern Miyagi, said the sirens would notify the public to "get inside, stay inside and stay tuned" for more information.

Mr Miyagi said the increased threat from North Korea was the reason behind the warnings.

The Pacific Daily News reported the signal test would take place on Friday and then the first business day of each month thereafter.

The state is also broadcasting public service announcements and conducting community meetings aimed at educating the public.

Stolen Spam used like currency in Hawaii

Tina Yamaki said thefts of Spam had escalated since a recent law change on the value of stolen goods defining a crime.

She said organised criminals appeared to be involved, with entire cases of Spam taken in some of the heists.

Ms Yamaki said the cans were often then sold out of the back of cars, at swap meets and some people are using Spam as currency and bartering for drugs with it.

Amnesty supports Hawaii on travel ban stance

Last month, the US Supreme Court let the Trump administration's executive order banning people from six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days go forward with a limited scope.

The restrictions ban grandparents.

The state had filed a motion in the US District Court hoping to include grandparents and other relatives, but that was rejected on Friday.

The chair of Amnesty International Hawaii Beatriz Cantelmo said the ban was discriminatory and very dangerous.

Thousands welcome the return of Hokule'a in Hawaii

After more than 40,000 nautical miles at sea, the Hokule'a was met just outside of the shores of Hawaii by a fleet of canoes from across the Pacific who led the Hokule'a to shore where the crew were greeted with flower leis (necklaces) and traditional Hawaiian chants.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs Community's Engagement Director Mehana Hind said locals spent days making hundreds of flower leis for the crew, and indigenous chants were written especially for the homecoming.

Mehana Hind knows family members who have been on board the Hōkūle'a.

Trump's 2.0 travel ban blocked by Hawaii court

The decision means that travellers from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the ban will still be able to travel to the US.

US District Judge Derrick Watson put an emergency stop to the new order in response to a lawsuit filed by the state of Hawaii, which argued the order discriminated against Muslims in violation of the constitution.

Trump travel ban: US judge blocks new executive order

 US District Judge Derrick Watson cited "questionable evidence" in the government's argument that the ban was a matter of national security.

President Trump described the ruling as "unprecedented judicial overreach".

The order would have placed a 90-day ban on people from six mainly Muslim nations and a 120-day ban on refugees.

Mr Trump insists the move is to stop terrorists from entering the US but critics say it is discriminatory.

An earlier version of the order, issued in late January, sparked confusion and protests, and was blocked by a judge in Seattle.

Zuckerberg drops case to acquire Hawaiian land

The billionaire tech mogul had filed a legal case seeking to acquire small pockets of land within his large estate on the island of Kauai.

But his use of the so-called "quiet title" legal system led to criticism from other residents.

He said he had not taken the time to fully understand the process. "It's clear we made a mistake," he said.

Mr Zuckerberg bought a 700-acre estate on the Hawaiian island, where he says his family wish to "put down roots".

However, the estate is littered with a number of small parcels of land called kuleana.