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Antivirus 'mistakenly' flags Windows as Malware and Facebook as Phishing site

The havoc caused after the company released a bad update on April 24, which was pulled after approximately 15 minutes. But that still hasn't stopped some PCs from receiving it, causing serious issues for not just individuals, but also companies and organizations relying on the software.

According to the reports by many customers on social media and Webroot's forum, hundreds and even thousands of systems were broken down after antivirus software flagged hundreds of benign files needed to run Windows and apps that run on top of the operating system.

Facebook wants to kill the password

For now, they are necessary, as well as regularly re-used, and sometimes leaked when hackers access private information. When you forget yours, the process to log back into an account you're locked out of is clunky and not as secure as it could be.

Facebook (FB, Tech30) wants to change that, and eventually, to make passwords obsolete.

Zuckerberg addresses 'Facebook killing'

"Our hearts go out to the family and friends of Robert Godwin Sr," said Mark Zuckerberg near the start of Facebook's annual F8 developers conference.

His social network had been criticised over the amount of time it had taken to take the clip offline.

About an hour before the event got underway, police had revealed that the murder suspect had killed himself.

Steve Stephens had been the subject of a national manhunt.

Murder raises uncomfortable issues for Facebook, other social networks

The killer that day paused in between shootings to mail to NBC News a manifesto in which he attempted to rationalize the attack. It arrived two days later.

Ten years later, murderers can just get on Facebook Live and attempt to rationalize their actions to their Facebook friends in real time.

Search for suspect in Facebook homicide video widens

Steve Stephens, 37, stands charged with Sunday's aggravated murder of 74-year-old Robert Godwin, and police Chief Calvin Williams said law enforcement nationwide are on high alert.

"This is what we would consider a national search for Steve," Williams told reporters. "So, we are not going to leave any stone unturned."

The suspect's mother said that when she last saw Stephens on Saturday, he said it would be a miracle if she ever saw him again. They spoke the next day, she said, and he told her he was shooting people because he was angry with his girlfriend.

Facebook targets 30,000 fake accounts in France

"Our priority, of course, is to remove the accounts with the largest footprint, with a high amount of activity and a broad reach," Facebook security manager Shabnam Shaik said in a blog post.

The social media giant acknowledged, however, that the purge will not remove all accounts that are spreading fake news. "We know we have to keep getting better," said Shaik.

"These accounts were targeted because they are fake. Full stop," a Facebook spokesman told CNNTech. He said that taking down fake accounts helps prevent hoaxes, spam, political trolling and fake news.

Facebook launches M — Its new digital assistant for Messenger

Back then, Facebook confirmed that it was testing its digital assistant codenamed Moneypenny. Facebook called it a new service inside Messenger that would complete tasks and look for information on your behalf. Powered by AI, M was supposed to be trained and supervised by real people.

Student Livestreams his “Suicide Tutorial” on Facebook, jumps to death

Named Arjun Bharadwaj, 23, he did so while live streaming a tutorial explaining “how to commit suicide.”

Arjun posted the video on his Facebook page and jumped off from the 19th floor of Mumbai’s Taj Lands End Hotel. The video, which is 1 minute and 43 seconds long, apparently gone viral on social media.

After Arjun jumped out of the window and the police was informed, he was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Facebook to tackle fake news with educational campaign

For three days, an ad will appear at the top of users' news feeds linking to advice on "how to spot fake news" and report it.

The campaign, which will be promoted in 14 countries, is "designed to help people become more discerning readers", the social media firm said.

But experts questioned whether the measure would have any real impact.

"Until Facebook stops rewarding the architects of fake news with huge traffic, this problem will just get worse," Tom Felle, a lecturer in digital journalism at City University told the BBC.

Facebook launches tools to combat revenge porn

The term refers to non-consensual pornography that's distributed online to shame, exploit or extort its victims.

And on Wednesday, the company said it would apply photo-matching to ensure intimate, nonconsensual images that are reported once aren't able to be uploaded again through Facebook's properties, including Messenger and Instagram.