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Facebook banned Neptune statue photo for being 'explicitly sexual'

Designed by Jean Boulogne, better known as Giambologna, the mid-sixteenth century fountain of Neptune stands in the Piazza del Nettuno in Bologna.

Facebook appeared to have taken offense at the disrobed Roman god, asking Italian writer Elisa Barbari to remove it from her Facebook page, "Stories, curiosities and views of Bologna," where she shares historical facts and oddities about the city.

Barbari had tried to use a photo from her personal collection but upon upload faced what appeared to be an automatic prohibition, deeming the image "explicitly sexual."

Facebook knows a lot about your “offline life” too

It uses the data to power its ever-growing advertising platform which is a significant part of the company’s income resources. They know if you hate Donald Trump or not, you recently watched a superhero movie or some chilling horror flick.

Personally, I have observed that the items I browse on the internet are likely to show up in my news feed. That’s the level of interest Facebook has in our lives. However, they admit this thing, and their policies reflect it. Anyways, to some extent, it is fine if Facebook follows us just on the internet to serve better ads.

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Missing student 'posts on Facebook'

Isabel Gayther, 21, was last seen at about 11:30 GMT on Christmas Eve.

Posts on her Facebook account in response to media coverage state she is "not missing" and has not come to harm.

The Met, which earlier said it was "concerned" for Miss Gayther, said it was aware of the messages but had not been able to speak to her.

A spokesman said an investigation continued, "with the aim of establishing that she is safe and well".

Miss Gayther lives in halls of residence in New Cross, south-east London.

She also has family in Oxford.

 

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

A University of Copenhagen study suggests excessive use of social media can create feelings of envy.

It particularly warns about the negative impact of "lurking" on social media without connecting with anyone.

The study suggests taking a break from using social media.

The study of more than 1,000 participants, mostly women, says that "regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life".

 

'Unrealistic social comparisons'

Facebook lurking makes you miserable, says study

A University of Copenhagen study suggests excessive use of social media can create feelings of envy.

It particularly warns about the negative impact of "lurking" on social media without connecting with anyone.

The study suggests taking a break from using social media.

The study of more than 1,000 participants, mostly women, says that "regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life".

'Unrealistic social comparisons'

Facebook, Google, Twitter accused of enabling ISIS

The suit claims that the three companies allowed ISIS access to its social networks for spreading terrorist propaganda, raising money and luring recruits. (The gunman who killed 49 people at the Orlando nightclub in June had repeatedly referenced ISIS.)

Facebook: Social network, media company - or both?

This abstract question may strike you as the preserve of Palo Alto wannabes, Lower East Side podcasters, and media navel-gazers closer to home.

In fact the answer, while complex, goes to the very essence of democracy in our time.

And you cannot understand Thursday's announcement from the company, about its clampdown on fake news, without answering the prior question above.

Fake news: Facebook rolls out new tools to tackle false stories

New reporting features are being rolled out, along with other changes designed to combat the spread of misinformation.

Facebook was widely criticised last month after some users complained that fake news had influenced the US presidential election.

The new features include the ability to flag fake stories, as well as possible future changes to Facebook's algorithm.

Extremist images 'fingerprinted' by tech firms

The four tech firms plan to create a database that contains "digital fingerprints" of the content.

The database will be used to screen uploads in order to spot violent or extremist material before it is shared.

Eventually, the database will be made available to other firms keen to police this content.

"There is no place for content that promotes terrorism on our hosted consumer services," said a spokesman for Twitter in a statement.

He said the initiative was aimed at the "most extreme and egregious" images and videos.

Facebook is teaching students how Artificial Intelligence works

The show is all about artificially intelligent robots, known as hosts, that have been assigned different tasks in an amusement park created for humans. Similar concepts — and the “impending doom” — have been outlined in many previous TV shows and movies.

Well, before we reach that level of advancement, we need to understand its benefits and how it’s making our lives better than ever. Facebook wants us to realize the same and tell that Artificial Intelligence is influencing all the key spheres of our lives.