Cuba

Trump threatens to roll back US-Cuba relations

"If Cuba is unwilling to make a better deal for the Cuban people, the Cuban/American people and the U.S. as a whole, I will terminate the deal," Trump tweeted.

Trump's threat came after the death of long-time Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, whose passing on Saturday he marked with another tweet. "Fidel Castro is dead!" the president-elect wrote, before issuing a statement condemning the Cuban leader.

O’Neill confident with country’s economy

In a press conference today after returning from the APEC Summit in Peru, O’Neill said the 21 APEC country leaders have confidence in PNG for hosting the APEC in 2018.

O’Neill said the government has continue to maintain the economic growth despite the challenges faced globally in regards to the falling of the commodity prices.

“The confidence expressed by the leaders to attend the APEC Summit in 2018 is overwhelming.”

PM O’Neill extends condolence following death of Fidel Castro

Prime Minister O’Neill, who arrived back from an official visit to Cuba on Friday, said at the passing of a world Leader, irrespective of politics, is a time to pause and reflect.

"It was only Tuesday night this week that I had dinner with President Raul Castro and he expressed his concern at the health of his brother,” the Prime Minister said.

"We did not expect that the passing of Fidel Castro would be so soon.

"The passing of Fidel Castro is another marker in global politics.

Cuba's Fidel Castro, dies aged 90

It provided no further details.

Fidel Castro ruled Cuba as a one-party state for almost half a century before handing over the powers to his brother Raul in 2008.

His supporters praised him as a man who had given Cuba back to the people. But his opponents accused him of brutally suppressing opposition.

In April, Fidel Castro gave a rare speech on the final day of the country's Communist Party congress.

He acknowledged his advanced age but said Cuban communist concepts were still valid and the Cuban people "will be victorious".

 

US changes vote on UN resolution against Cuba embargo

Holiday shopping, the city's marathon, and the US voting against the rest of the world at the UN over Washington's Cuba embargo.

On Wednesday, however, the US took the small but significant step of changing its vote to an abstention on the annual UN General Assembly resolution calling for an end to the US economic embargo of the island nation.

Trump threatens to reverse diplomatic relations with Cuba

The Republican nominee also said he would do "whatever you have to do to get a strong agreement," even if that meant breaking off the recently-resumed diplomatic relations.

"I just want to press -- would you break off diplomatic relations, though, on day one?" CBS4's Jim Defede asked Trump.

Russia 'considering military bases in Cuba and Vietnam'

Nikolai Pankov announced a review of the decision to close the two bases more than a decade ago.

The two served as pivots of Soviet military power during the Cold War.

It comes amid growing tensions between the US and Russia, and as Russia's parliament approved a longer term military presence at a Syrian airbase.

Mr Pankov told the Russian parliament on Friday they were "dealing with the issue" of the two bases, Russian news agencies reported.

He declined to go into detail.

Cuba plans to install wi-fi on Havana's iconic Malecon seafront

The move will make the popular area for tourists and young people into the largest hotspot on the island.

Only about 5% of Cubans enjoy web access at home and the government still heavily restricts content, although many social media sites are available.

Since last year the government has installed dozens of wi-fi hotspots in public areas, charging $2 an hour.

Although the price of wi-fi access in public places has recently dropped, it is still prohibitive for the vast majority of Cubans. The average state salary remains about $25 (£19) a month.

Barack Obama: 'Change is going to happen in Cuba'

He is the first sitting US president to visit since the 1959 revolution, which heralded decades of hostility between the two countries.

Mr Obama said change would happen in Cuba and that Cuban President Raul Castro understood that.

The two leaders met to talk about trade and held a joint news conference.

Mr Castro denied that there are political prisoners in Cuba, telling journalists to "give him a list" and then they would be released "tonight".

Obama arrives in Cuba for what he calls a "historic visit"

"This is a historic visit and a historic opportunity," Obama said as he greeted staff of the new U.S. Embassy in Havana.

Air Force One touched down on a rainy, overcast day in the Cuban capital. The president was joined by wife Michelle Obama and daughters Malia and Sasha.

Obama was greeted by top Cuban officials — but not President Raul Castro. The Cuban leader frequently greets major world figures upon their arrival at Jose Marti International Airport, but was absent on the tarmac. Instead, he planned to greet Obama on Monday at the Palace of the Revolution.