children

Children get traumatised in violent homes: Magistrate

Senior Magistrate, Albert Daniels, said: “If you are a dad, I want you to know that if your daughter has seen you violently behaving towards her mum, she doesn’t trust you anymore to look after her.

“If your son has seen you violent towards his mum, he has experienced trauma too, it will show when he grows into an adult and follows your example. So think about how your actions today will affect the future,” he said.

Digicel lends timely help to 50 HART children with back to school items

Digicel staff got together and contributed general school stationary items while Star Printery gave all the exercise books to the children.

Digicel Fiji CEO, Mike Greig made the presentation and met the children and encouraged them to do their best in school this year.

“This is an excellent gesture at the start of the year, I want to thank Digicel Fiji staff who took pride and made an effort to buy stationary and help some needy children in our community,” said Greig.

Around 5,000 homeless children in NCD

Pake and his wife run the biggest orphanage in the city, which currently accommodates 54 children.

They not only accommodate, they also educate those unfortunate children and even cater for up to 100 children on weekends during its street beat programs.

A program that started almost 10 years ago, Life PNG Care is on a mission of rehabilitation at its home that provides accommodation for those vulnerable children, advocates for child protection and runs the street beat program.

Concerns raised over safety of Hela children, women

The Family and Sexual Violence Action Committee (FSVAC), a sectoral committee of the Consultative Implementation and Monitoring Council (CIMC), is appealing to community leaders, tribal leaders and individuals, including men, to put an end to the fighting and pursue conflict resolution so that much needed humanitarian support and government assistance can continue into the province.

What happens to inmates’ children?

Olivia Warome was sentenced to prison last month where she is serving a sentence of 9 years.

The 30-year-old from Watabung village in Daulo district, Eastern Highlands, left behind two children to go serve her sentence.

She has a six-month-old infant currently in her care at Bomana however, she is raising concerns about her other children.  

She said most times the children they leave behind have their rights breached.

“They are not going to school, maybe they are not eating well,” stated Warome.

Rights of a child forgotten in prison

These innocent victims of crimes committed by their mothers spend up to three years in jail until they are released back into the communities with families.

They eat what is basically served to older inmates – a diet that consists of staple foods. 

The Bomana correctional institute outside the nation's capital is no different.

With a female population of 30, it currently has two toddlers under the age of 3 who are under the care of their convicted mothers.

Acute malnutrition on rise in NCD

Nutritionist Sr Dani Aiva Stocks, from NCD Health Services, says this is a direct impact of the rise in prices of goods and services, greatly affecting mothers and children in marginalised communities.

Small urban clinics like the Gordon Health Centre attend to 24 malnutrition cases per month while major hospitals such as Gerehu and Kaugere record more.

Early Xmas for Friends Foundation children

The charity organisation today had a small Christmas party, gifting the kids with early Christmas presents.

These are children exposed to HIV and or living with HIV.

The foundation provides support for this group of population.

This event was made possible through a donation by the Gordon’s International School.

Earlier this month, the school hosted a Christmas carol event, a fundraiser which raised about K20,000.

All these proceeds were given to the foundation.

Children most affected

However, they still lack the voice on a national platform, says Anna Solomon, secretary for Religion, Youth and Community Development 

Solomon said ending violence was important for the benefit of the children.

“Focus on children now,” she said.

“Mothers, stand strong…we have a right to a safe home and the children have a right to a healthy mother,” she added.

She noted too many school fights, systems and alcohol abuse affecting the whole nation.

Public health still a problem in PNG: NGO

According to Susu Mamas, PNG still has one of the highest mortality rates for children under five years of age in the Western Pacific Region.

Susu Mamas is a registered national non-government organisation providing free integrated primary health care services, including maternal and child health services in a number of urban health facilities and mobile rural outreach services.